National Civic Review

How to Minimize Money’s Role in Politics

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
June 30, 2006 |

One of the most discussed political reforms over the last 30 years has been campaign finance reform. That reform effort blames much of what ails our representative democracy on the pernicious effect of private money in politics. In the 1990s, tales of the Keating Five, Lincoln Bedroom, and Buddhist temples became the stuff of political legend. More recently, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was accused of campaign and money laundering violations and lobbyist Jack Abramoff pled guilty to influence peddling and bribery of various Congressional members.

Setting a New Goalpost: 100 Percent Voter Registration

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Rob Richie
January 31, 2006 |

Our country's strength flows from its willingness to innovate and improve upon the American experiment in democracy. Recent presidential elections underscore the importance of revamping the way we register citizens to vote.

Divided We Stand: The Polarizing of American Politics

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
January 31, 2006 |
Divided we stand:  The Polarizing of American Politics
by Steven Hill
 

Solving a Classic Dilemma of Democratic Politics

  • By
  • J.H. Snider,
  • New America Foundation
January 10, 2006 |

This article is adapted from the last chapter of the author's book Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick: How Local TV Broadcasters Exert Political Power (New York: iUniverse, 2005).

Programs:

Alleviating the Problem of Rational Voter Ignorance: A Proposal for a "Ballot Portal"

  • By
  • J.H. Snider,
  • New America Foundation
May 1, 2004 |

Political scientists have long observed that what is good for the individual may be bad for the group. Under a ruthless dictatorship, for example, the people might want to overthrow their leaders and establish a democratic government. But it is very risky for any particular individual to participate in such an uprising. The individual bears all the costs, but the public at large receives the lion's share of the benefits. Economists call such goods "public goods." National Defense is a classic example.

Programs:

Should the Public Meeting Enter the Information Age?

  • By
  • J.H. Snider,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2003 |

Attachments

Programs:

Unity and Community in the Twenty-First Century

  • By
  • Ted Halstead,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Michael Lind
June 1, 2002 |

"Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types of disposition, are forever forming associations," the French philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville observed in his famous 1835 tract, Democracy in America. "There are not only commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but others of a thousand different types -- religious, moral, serious, futile, very general and very limited, immensely large and very minute

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