Harvard Business Review

Making the Most of Webinars

  • By
  • Rachel Burstein,
  • New America Foundation
March 27, 2013 |

Big Beer, A Moral Market, and Innovation

  • By
  • Barry C. Lynn,
  • New America Foundation
January 2, 2013 |

On the surface, America's market for beer has never looked healthier. Where fewer than a hundred companies brewed a generation ago, we can now count more than 2,000, producing a mind-boggling variety of beers. Yet just below this drinker's paradise we find a market that has never been more concentrated. Two giants — Anheuser-Busch Inbev and MillerCoors — control some 90 percent of production.

Enroll the World in For-Profit Universities

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
January 3, 2012 |

The new year begins precariously. The global economy vacillates between signs of recovery and omens of collapse. Businesses seem paralyzed. Even though they’re sitting on $2 trillion in cash, they’re risk-averse, strategically incremental, and notably lacking in fresh ideas.

We think this stinks. The world needs invention and daring now more than ever. Now is the time for audacity, not austerity.

What Sells When Father Knows Best

  • By
  • Phillip Longman,
  • New America Foundation
February 2, 2007 |

The comedian Dick Cavett once quipped, “If your parents never had children, chances are you won’t either.” It’s a funny thought, but it gets at something real.

What Should USTech's Sourcing Strategy Be?

  • By
  • Barry C. Lynn,
  • New America Foundation
March 1, 2006 |

Greg should consider himself lucky. The cozy relationship between USTech and TaiSource was speeding toward a crisis even before he hired Morris. But thanks to what he learned from that questionable decision, Greg now has an opportunity to fix USTech's sourcing strategy before disaster strikes.

A Homestead Act for the Twenty-First Century

  • By
  • Ted Halstead,
  • New America Foundation
February 3, 2006 |

The United States owes much of its status as the first mass middle-class society to enlightened social policy designed to broaden asset ownership. To this day, a quarter of all adult Americans enjoy a legacy of asset ownership traceable to the Homestead Act of 1862, which awarded 60 acres of land in the American West to families who lived on the land for five years. Likewise, the GI Bill, the Federal Housing Administration, and mortgage deduction policies paved the way for one of the highest home-ownership rates in the world.

Vanishing Jobs? Blame the Boomers

  • By
  • Phillip Longman,
  • New America Foundation
March 8, 2005 |

To all the brouhaha over offshoring in America, one rejoinder is that any unemployment is temporary. When the mass of baby boomers starts retiring in the next few years, the argument goes, there will be plenty of work for anyone in the baby bust generation whose job went overseas. That may be a comforting thought for U.S. baby busters, but it's probably wrong. Despite their small numbers, the busters may paradoxically see unemployment get worse, not better.

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