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The Emerging Power of Big Data

  • By Emerging Leaders, The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
June 17, 2014
Big data is transforming the commercial marketplace but it also has the potential to reshape government affairs and urban development.  In a new report from the Emerging Leaders Program at the Chicago Council of Global Affairs, Lincoln S. Ellis, a founding member of the World Economic Roundtable, and other authors from the Emerging Leaders Program, explore how big data can be used by mega-cities to meet the challenges they face in an age of resource constraints to improve the lives of their residents.
 
Programs:

The U.S. Economy After The Great Recession

  • By
  • Sherle R. Schwenninger,
  • Samuel Sherraden,
  • New America Foundation
March 4, 2014
The bursting of the housing bubble in 2008 plunged the U.S. economy into a serious crisis, leaving American households with a huge debt overhang and the economy with a large gap in output and employment. This report reviews the economy’s deleveraging and recovery experience more than five years after the crash. It explores the following questions:  
  • How far has the economy come in the deleveraging process? Is private sector debt now at a sustainable level or do households and the financial sector continue to need to pay down debt?  
  • To what extent has the U.S.

America Can Help Fix the World by Fixing Itself

May 29, 2013

By Jay Pelosky

This op-ed originally appeared in Reuters and is based on the recent World Economic Roundtable Paper, "Building a Bridge to a Tri-Polar World Economy: An American Growth Strategy."

From Growth Compression to Reflation: The Road Ahead

November 28, 2012

by Jay Pelosky

This article originally appeared in The Huffington Post. View the original piece here.

How U.S. Can Once Again Define the Future

  • By
  • Patrick C. Doherty,
  • New America Foundation
November 27, 2012 |

Washington is all about the fiscal cliff these days. In Doha, Qatar, world leaders are negotiating over climate change. Federal debt and carbon emissions are indeed two big problems on the nation's front burner. But they are just the beginning.

As the fog of the election season lifts, America has a lot to worry about -- everything from competing economically with China to housing rapidly retiring baby boomers.

Economic Recovery and Social Investment

  • By Robert Kuttner, The American Prospect
November 26, 2012

Today’s prolonged economic slump is fundamentally different from an ordinary recession. In the aftermath of a severe financial collapse, an economy is at risk of succumbing to a prolonged deflationary undertow. With asset prices reduced, the financial system damaged, unemployment high, consumer demand depressed, and businesses reluctant to invest, the economy gets stuck well below its full employment potential.

Debt, Deficits, and Demographics

  • By Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research
November 19, 2012

For much of the last three decades, policy debates in the United States have been dominated by a quixotic concern about deficits, debt, and demographics. This concern has distracted policy from fundamental economic issues that have much more direct bearing on economic well-being, most notably the growth (and bursting) of the housing bubble in the last decade. While large deficits can have a negative impact on economic growth, this impact has been hugely misrepresented in public debates.

The New Silk Road is Made of Iron-And Stretches from Scotland to Singapore

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
September 30, 2012 |

At some point in the next 200 million years, according to Yale University scientists, the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates will collide at the North Pole. When they are eventually joined by Africa, the singular super-continent will re-emerge, reminiscent of the Pangea that existed hundreds of millions of years ago.

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