Asia

The Drawdown Debate

  • By
  • Douglas Ollivant,
  • New America Foundation
June 20, 2011 |

The Afghanistan comments -- if perhaps not a fully articulated Afghanistan policy -- expressed by Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman (and to a lesser extent, Mitt Romney) provide an opportunity for a real look at a long-term U.S. policy for Afghanistan. The current debate over troop levels is good in that it focuses attention on the problem, but asking how many troops we should withdraw this summer and over the coming year is the wrong question, and much too narrowly focused. To date, our actions in Afghanistan seem to be reactive.

The Big Test

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
June 10, 2011 |

For three days each June, all of China quiets to a whisper. In Shanghai, the ever-present construction crews are furloughed, and thousands of uniformed signal guards are deployed to stop drivers from sounding their horns. Similar noise-reduction campaigns are put in place in other cities across the country.

The White House Debates Afghanistan—Again

  • By
  • Fred Kaplan,
  • New America Foundation
June 9, 2011 |

The White House debate over how many troops to withdraw from Afghanistan next month is really a surrogate for a larger, more fractious debate over the wisdom and strategy of the war itself.

Five Myths About Pakistan

  • By
  • Anatol Lieven,
  • New America Foundation
June 6, 2011 |

Late last month, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said there was no evidence that Pakistani officials had known that Osama bin Laden lived undetected blocks from the country's equivalent to West Point. But after the al-Qaeda leader was killed in Abbottabad on May 1, others were skeptical. "How could they not know?" said Sen. John Kerry (D. - Mass.). "Did nobody have some questions about who the hell was living behind those walls?"

Where the River Ends

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
June 2, 2011 |

In glittering Shanghai, known for its hopping night life and influx of Western luxury stores, a VIP cocktail reception last Thursday night, May 26,marked the opening of a new H&M clothing store on upscale Nanjing Road. As a parade of BMWs, Audis, and Mercedes pulled up to valet parking alongside a red carpet unfurled on the sidewalk, an observer might never have suspected that the local government here in China's richest and most urbane city has been struggling with two very basic problems: keeping the water running and the power on.

An Insider's View of the Palestinian Unity Deal

  • By
  • Tom Kutsch,
  • New America Foundation
May 6, 2011 |

A unity agreement signed this week in Cairo between Palestinian political factions marks the first time in 4 years that a Palestinian government will be unified across the West Bank and Gaza (hitherto the territories were split between governments led by Fatah in the former and Hamas in the latter).

The Outlaw

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
May 16, 2011 |

ABSTRACT: A REPORTER AT LARGE about the life and death of Osama bin Laden and bin Laden’s use of the media to expand his influence. Writer recalls travelling to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2005, where he saw the house in which bin Laden had come of age and also visited the offices of an advertising agency run by bin Laden’s eldest son, Abdullah. Comments on the similarities between the house in Jeddah and the house in Pakistan where bin Laden was killed.

Programs:

China, IPOs and a Transforming Economy

  • By
  • Afshin Molavi,
  • New America Foundation
July 22, 2010 |

Behind the astronomic figures and shattered records, the Agricultural Bank of China's celebrated initial public offering reveals the growing financial ties between the Middle Kingdom and the Middle East, reflects a maturing China broadening its domestic growth strategy, and demonstrates the importance of Asia to global recovery.

As China's Growth Slows, the World Will Feel the Pinch

  • By
  • Afshin Molavi,
  • New America Foundation
March 16, 2011 |

The Chinese premier Wen Jiabao is not a man given to revolutionary rhetoric. He normally speaks in the dry, careful language characteristic of Beijing's leaders. But six words he uttered last week could have revolutionary consequences for China, the world, and the Middle East.

Did he comment on Libya's civil war? On rising oil prices? On Middle East unrest? None of the above. In fact, he simply made a matter-of-fact declaration about China's future economic intentions. Here were the six words: "We will actively boost consumer demand."

Don't Count on a Peace Deal with Taliban

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
May 24, 2011 |

Recently, both The Washington Post and the German magazine Der Spiegel have reported on meetings between U.S. officials and representatives of the Taliban that have taken place in Germany to discuss some form of peace negotiations.

Talking to the Taliban makes sense, but there are major impediments standing in the way of a deal.

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