Asia

Will North Korea Stay Crazy?

  • By
  • Fred Kaplan,
  • New America Foundation
December 20, 2011 |

Kim Jong-il, the pygmy tyrant of North Korea, is dead at the age of 69. His 28-year-old son, Kim Jong-un, now assumes the throne of Pyongyang. According to various press analyses, the new leader is either a bumbling naïf or a clever, multilingual operator who's already formed alliances with key generals. He will either push market reforms or preserve the status quo. He will reach out to the West or step up confrontation or do neither.

Here's the real answer: We really don't know much of anything.

Change Afghanistan Can Believe In

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
December 12, 2011 |

After 10 years of war and reconstruction, and as tens of thousands of international troops and aid workers in Afghanistan gear up to spend yet another holiday season a long way from the comforts of home, a lot of people are wondering: Was it worth it? Certainly Dec.

Democracy Promotion: Done Right, A Progressive Cause

  • By
  • Rosa Brooks,
  • New America Foundation
December 14, 2011 |

By the beginning of the Obama Administration, democracy promotion had become a rather tarnished idea, and understandably so. Like Islam or Christianity, much blood has been shed beneath its banner. It may be true that democracies don’t go to war with one another, but they certainly go to war, and their wars kill people just as dead as the wars undertaken by illiberal regimes. Anyone on the political left can tell the story: During the Cold War, the United States fought endless proxy wars and engaged in a great deal of overt and covert mischief, all in the name of democracy.

India’s Approach to Counterinsurgency and the Naxalite Problem

  • By
  • Sameer Lalwani,
  • New America Foundation

Since its independence in 1947, India has fought dozens of campaigns against four distinct and independent insurgencies on its soil—in Punjab, Kashmir, the Northeast, and the Maoist insurgents of central India—as well as one foreign campaign in Sri Lanka.

The UN Capital Development Fund explores link between Microfinance and Social Protection

December 8, 2011
http://www.flickr.com/photos/zingbot/5357682085/

Last week, the UN Capital Development Fund hosted a high-level Thinkshop entitled “How can microfinance extend Social Protection in Asian Lesser Developed Countries (LDCs)?” Animating the event was the belief that “private financial arrangements provide the single biggest opportunity, albeit one of the least explored, to extend social protection in developing countries, and especially in Asian LDCs.” Other than being a stellar opportunity to share the groundbreaking work of our Global Savings and Social Protection (GSSP) Initiative and SPINNAKER, the event offered insight into new and potentially revolutionary role that microfinance institutions (MFIs) might play in helping protect the extreme poor through products that kickstart savings as opposed to causing debt.

How to Improve the Advisers

  • By
  • Fred Kaplan,
  • New America Foundation
December 6, 2011 |

Two things are clear about U.S. policy toward Afghanistan. First, we are steadily withdrawing our combat troops over the next two years. Second, we have no plan for ensuring that the place doesn't fall apart afterward.

Obama's Foreign Policy Doctrine Finally Emerges with 'Offshore Balancing'

  • By
  • Peter Beinart,
  • New America Foundation
November 28, 2011 |

What does America's disastrous bombing of Pakistani soldiers this week have to do with President Obama's much-ballyhooed trip to East Asia last week? Between them, they suggest that the Obama administration may be, finally, edging toward a foreign-policy doctrine.

Programs:

China's Innovation Policy Is All Wrong

  • By
  • Konstantin Kakaes,
  • New America Foundation
July 20, 2011 |

Will it be able to come up with a new one? Here is a story that Robert O’Brien tells in a recent paper in the journal China Security. In 2005, China’s National Development and Reform Commission, which had the power to set government procurement policies, said that state-owned wind farms could only buy turbines that had 70 percent of their parts made in China.

What's Behind the Furor in Pakistan?

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • Andrew Lebovich,
  • New America Foundation
November 25, 2011 |

Pakistani-American businessman Mansoor Ijaz has set off a political firestorm in Pakistan with his claims that he was brokering an offer from Pakistan's civilian leaders to the Pentagon to unseat the leadership of the Pakistani military.

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