Asia

Does Norway Hold Key to Solving South China Sea Dispute?

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
  • and John Gilman
November 13, 2012 |

The South China Sea has returned to the geopolitical spotlight, eclipsing the Taiwan Straits as the region's most volatile flashpoint.

But quite unlike the Taiwan or the associated Quemoy/Matsu dispute, the South China Sea's claimant nations are at least as interested in developing the region's economic potential as they are in asserting sovereignty and building military bases.

This opens a window to resolving the dispute in a way that looks beyond the traditional frame of sovereignty and towards a win-win economic benefit.

From Social Banking to Financial Inclusion: Understanding the Potential for Financial Services Innovation in India

  • By
  • Eric Tyler,
  • Anjana Ravi,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Sunil Bhat, Minakshi Ramji and Anjaneyulu Ballem (MicroSave)
October 29, 2012

When it comes to savings for the poor and financial inclusion efforts, India is a dynamic market ripe for innovation and experimentation. Its extensive web of financial service providers as well as the incidence of large-scale exclusion are contradictory features that also make it a market worth examining.

Investing in Girls

  • By
  • Jamie M. Zimmerman,
  • Nicole Tosh,
  • Jamie Holmes,
  • New America Foundation
October 11, 2012

Over the last decade, anti-poverty initiatives across the developing world have increasingly focused on gender-based strategies, and in particular, on achieving equality and empowerment through gender-focused program innovation. While important progress has been made in the last several years, men still outnumber women in paid employment in almost every region of the developing world, with more women working informally, and in more vulnerable employment positions, than men.

The New Silk Road is Made of Iron-And Stretches from Scotland to Singapore

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
September 30, 2012 |

At some point in the next 200 million years, according to Yale University scientists, the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates will collide at the North Pole. When they are eventually joined by Africa, the singular super-continent will re-emerge, reminiscent of the Pangea that existed hundreds of millions of years ago.

Why China’s Slowdown May Get Permanently Worse

  • By
  • Steve LeVine,
  • New America Foundation
September 27, 2012 |

For years, global economists have forecast a slowdown in China’s breakneck growth. Now that the deceleration is actually here, rich-world investors, companies and government officials, reliant on the Chinese juggernaut for their financial well-being, seem impatient for the revelry to resume, and are hoping that the Chinese government will follow up its stimulus of package of 2008-2009 with another generous injection of capital. (On Sept.

A Glitch in the Matrix

  • By
  • Barry C. Lynn,
  • New America Foundation
September 11, 2012 |

Economic interdependence among nations, Americans have long believed, is the surest and safest path both to a wide prosperity and a perpetual peace. If all nations jointly depend together on one vast "global" factory for many basic goods, so our thinking holds, no one state will ever dare disrupt the functioning of this "communalized" system.

Don’t Bet on the End of China’s Growth Miracle

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
September 2, 2012 |

In 2011, China’s economy grew 9.2 percent, compared with 10.4 percent in 2010. In the second quarter of 2012 that growth rate had fallen further, to 7.6 percent. That’s set alarm bells ringing about the fate of the China miracle. Will the most successful and rapid decline in global poverty in the history of humanity shudder to a halt? Will the Asian Century be postponed, leaving the U.S., against the odds, as the undisputed top nation for the foreseeable future?

Sense and Nonsense About Obama and Osama

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
August 29, 2012 |

On Wednesday some media outlets obtained copies of the heavily embargoed book "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen, the pseudonym of one of the Navy SEALs who was part of the mission that killed Osama bin Laden.

Sporting Chance

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
August 6, 2012 |

ABSTRACT: PROFILES about Imran Khan. Khan, who once ruled the sport of cricket from Karachi to Lord’s, is in contention to rule the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. Khan makes for an unusual politician—a former tabloid celebrity aspiring to negotiate with the Taliban. He is rated in opinion polls as his country’s most popular politician. He leads the somewhat amorphous party Tehreek-e-Insaf, or the Movement for Justice, which he founded in 1996. It promises a crackdown on corruption, freedom from American influence, competent governance, and a more equitable economy.

Programs:

What's Working in Pakistan

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
July 23, 2012 |

Pakistan can't get no respect.
 
In 2007, Newsweek published an influential cover story proclaiming it "the most dangerous country in the world."
 
The bill of particulars for this indictment typically includes the inarguable facts that the Taliban is headquartered in Pakistan, as is what remains of al-Qaeda, as well as an alphabet soup of other jihadist terrorist groups.
 
And in 2011, it became embarrassingly clear that Pakistan had harbored Osama bin Laden for almost a decade, even if unwittingly, in a city not far from the capital, Islamabad.

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