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Public Education

Federal Funding for Students with Disabilities

  • By
  • Clare McCann,
  • New America Foundation
June 27, 2014

In Federal Funding for Students with Disabilities: The Evolution of Federal Special Education Finance in the U.S., New America provides a history of special education financing in the U.S., and highlights the latest shift in the mission of the IDEA funding formula: a change from providing dollars directly based on the number of special education students, to ensuring the federal government provides sufficient resources for those students without encouraging the over-identifi

Shutdown Got Your Data? Check Out Our Federal Education Database

October 15, 2013
Publication Image

The federal government has been officially shut down for over two weeks now, and the impact has been real: furloughed employees across the country, Head Start programs shut down (and some reopened), and confusion and delays in many federal programs. But for education experts and data geeks, another issue has been highly inconvenient, if less severe: the disabling of federal education data websites.

Fortunately, Early Ed Watch’s sister initiative, the Federal Education Budget Project, maintains one of the most comprehensive federal education databases in the country for every state, school district, and institution of higher education. The data are collected from state and federal sources and updated regularly. The PreK-12 data for more than 13,700 school districts and every state include:

  • Federal funding information, like per pupil expenditures, Title I and IDEA allocations, and school lunch awards;
  • Pre-K information for state-funded pre-K, Head Start, and special education preschool grants;
  • Demographic information on enrollment and racial, economic, and academic subgroups; and
  • Achievement data for math and reading in 4th grade, 8th grade, and high school, both for state standardized tests and the NAEP exam.

Check it out now, and until the shutdown is over! For some background on the data and on other education policy topics, check out our Background & Analysis pages.

Shutdown Got Your Data? Check Out Our Federal Education Database

October 15, 2013
Publication Image

The federal government has been officially shut down for over two weeks now, and the impact has been real: furloughed employees across the country, Head Start programs shut down (and some reopened), and confusion and delays in many federal programs. But for education experts and data geeks, another issue has been highly inconvenient, if less severe: the disabling of federal education data websites.

Fortunately, Ed Money Watch’s parent initiative, the Federal Education Budget Project, maintains one of the most comprehensive federal education databases in the country for every state, school district, and institution of higher education. The data are collected from state and federal sources and updated regularly. The PreK-12 data for more than 13,700 school districts and every state include:

  • Federal funding information, like per pupil expenditures, Title I and IDEA allocations, and school lunch awards;
  • Pre-K information for state-funded pre-K, Head Start, and special education preschool grants;
  • Demographic information on enrollment and racial, economic, and academic subgroups; and
  • Achievement data for math and reading in 4th grade, 8th grade, and high school, both for state standardized tests and the NAEP exam.

The higher education data cover more than 7,500 institutions and all 50 states, plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico, and include:

  • Tuition and fees, price, endowment, and net price for all and for low-income students;
  • Federal finance data on student loan recipients and disbursements for schools, as well as Pell Grant and other federal aid data;
  • Student demographics, including full-time, part-time, and graduate student enrollment, as well as racial subgroups;
  • Outcomes as defined by graduation rates, retention rates, student loan default rates, and repayment rates; and
  • The share of students receiving federal, state, and local financial aid, as well as the average award size.

Check it out now, and until the shutdown is over! For some background on the data and on other education policy topics, check out our Background & Analysis pages.

Tired of Federal Gridlock? Take a Look at Education Reform in the States

October 14, 2013

As the government shutdown continues (with no end yet visible), it’s easy—and wholly understandable—to get cynical. If we can’t manage basic stuff like funding the federal government, it’s hard to expect any sort of meaningful, exciting, education (or otherwise) policy reforms. In times like these, it’s good to keep an eye on the states.

So, if you’re looking for evidence for the potential of new education policy reforms, take a look at the National Governors Association’s recent report, “A Governor’s Guide to Early Literacy: Getting All Students Reading By Third Grade.”

Government Shutdown Strands Departments of Education, HHS with Few Staff, No Money

October 1, 2013

This post first appeared on our sister blog, Ed Money Watch.

Congress spent the final moments of fiscal year 2013 last night in the throes of a debate over funding the government. Unable to reach agreement despite days of back-and-forth between the House and Senate, however, the government officially shut down at midnight on September 30.

Federal agencies were ordered just before midnight to begin implementing plans for a federal shutdown absent funding for fiscal year 2014, which began on October 1. Skeleton crews will remain in place at the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services (HHS) for the length of the shutdown, but most employees will be furloughed.

The first few days of the shutdown likely won’t be very severe. Education programs funded with mandatory spending—including Pell Grants and federal student loans—will continue to operate as normal. And most of the big K-12 programs, namely Title I grants to low-income students and IDEA special education grants to states, have already seen a substantial portion of their funding disbursed. Those and other programs that have already been awarded will be okay in the short term.

Some other programs won’t be so lucky. About 20 Head Start programs, enrolling nearly 19,000 children, have grants that expire on October 1 and won’t receive new funding to continue operating until the shutdown is resolved. Other federal programs, including work-study aid for college students, will also be delayed.

If the shutdown wears on, though, it could start to impact school districts, institutions of higher education, and postsecondary students more severely. Some staffers for the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services will return to the agencies to ensure operations function as normally as possible. But with no funding appropriated yet for fiscal year 2014, school districts and students are sure to pay the cost.

The dispute that led to the first federal shutdown in 17 years centered around the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the healthcare law passed in 2010 for which some provisions also went into effect on October 1. Some Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives insisted on defunding and/or delaying for one year the law’s implementation, while Democrats in Congress, as well as President Obama, demanded a clean funding bill with no alterations to the healthcare law.

The debate over the Affordable Care Act is masking another divide in Congress that needs to be resolved before an annual appropriations bill is finalized, though: how and whether to fund domestic programs within a shrunken budget.

The 2011 Budget Control Act sets an overall limit on funding for domestic programs, and to avoid finding the required spending cuts in fiscal year 2013, Congress and the president enacted a law in late 2012 to reduce the 2014 levels further. That means this year, lawmakers will have to find another $18 billion in cuts to fiscal year 2014 appropriations to avert mandatory and automatic across-the-board sequesters applied to most federal programs.

But Senate Democrats have said they won’t support a bill within those limits, and House Republicans now have cold feet having realized they’d have to cut a big chunk of domestic funding back to fiscal year 2002 levels. So neither the House nor Senate has voted to approve its own spending bill for the Departments of Labor, HHS, and Education. Assuming lawmakers don’t manage to find the cuts themselves, many federal programs, including most education ones, will be sequestered again. The continuing resolutions debated over the past week have appropriated well above the 2014 rate, at prior-year levels. That means lawmakers have likely set up federal programs for another round of blunt cuts down the line.

All in all, the shutdown leaves policymakers in D.C. and recipients of federal dollars around the country with a great deal of uncertainty. Congress could choose to end this shutdown quickly, before many serious side-effects occur. Or the shutdown could drag on, with neither side willing to cave. There could even be a short-term temporary funding bill—as short as one week, some lawmakers have argued—that would precipitate another round of the same debates almost immediately.

Finally, in just a few weeks, on October 17, the U.S. is projected to reach the nation’s debt ceiling. A bill to raise the debt ceiling could be seen as a prime legislative vehicle to pass a 2014 spending bill – but some members of Congress are considering yet another showdown when the debt ceiling debate rolls around.

Check back with Ed Money Watch and Higher Ed Watch over the coming weeks for more details, and for information on the 2013 and 2014 appropriations process, we’ve got the details in our April 2013 issue brief, Federal Education Budget Update: Fiscal Year 2013 Recap and Fiscal Year 2014 Early Analysis.

Government Shutdown Strands Departments of Education, HHS with Few Staff, No Money

October 1, 2013

This post first appeared on our sister blog, Ed Money Watch.

Congress spent the final moments of fiscal year 2013 last night in the throes of a debate over funding the government. Unable to reach agreement despite days of back-and-forth between the House and Senate, however, the government officially shut down at midnight on September 30.

Federal agencies were ordered just before midnight to begin implementing plans for a federal shutdown absent funding for fiscal year 2014, which began on October 1. Skeleton crews will remain in place at the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services (HHS) for the length of the shutdown, but most employees will be furloughed.

Government Shutdown Strands Departments of Education, HHS with Few Staff, No Money

October 1, 2013

This post also appeared on our sister blogs, Early Ed Watch and Higher Ed Watch.

Congress spent the final moments of fiscal year 2013 last night in the throes of a debate over funding the government. Unable to reach agreement despite days of back-and-forth between the House and Senate, however, the government officially shut down at midnight on September 30.

Federal agencies were ordered just before midnight to begin implementing plans for a federal shutdown absent funding for fiscal year 2014, which began on October 1. Skeleton crews will remain in place at the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services (HHS) for the length of the shutdown, but most employees will be furloughed.

The first few days of the shutdown likely won’t be very severe. Education programs funded with mandatory spending—including Pell Grants and federal student loans—will continue to operate as normal. And most of the big K-12 programs, namely Title I grants to low-income students and IDEA special education grants to states, have already seen a substantial portion of their funding disbursed. Those and other programs that have already been awarded will be okay in the short term.

Some other programs won’t be so lucky. About 20 Head Start programs, enrolling nearly 19,000 children, have grants that expire on October 1 and won’t receive new funding to continue operating until the shutdown is resolved. Other federal programs, including work-study aid for college students, will also be delayed.

If the shutdown wears on, though, it could start to impact school districts, institutions of higher education, and postsecondary students more severely. Some staffers for the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services will return to the agencies to ensure operations function as normally as possible. But with no funding appropriated yet for fiscal year 2014, school districts and students are sure to pay the cost.

The dispute that led to the first federal shutdown in 17 years centered around the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the healthcare law passed in 2010 for which some provisions also went into effect on October 1. Some Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives insisted on defunding and/or delaying for one year the law’s implementation, while Democrats in Congress, as well as President Obama, demanded a clean funding bill with no alterations to the healthcare law.

The debate over the Affordable Care Act is masking another divide in Congress that needs to be resolved before an annual appropriations bill is finalized, though: how and whether to fund domestic programs within a shrunken budget.

The 2011 Budget Control Act sets an overall limit on funding for domestic programs, and to avoid finding the required spending cuts in fiscal year 2013, Congress and the president enacted a law in late 2012 to reduce the 2014 levels further. That means this year, lawmakers will have to find another $18 billion in cuts to fiscal year 2014 appropriations to avert mandatory and automatic across-the-board sequesters applied to most federal programs.

But Senate Democrats have said they won’t support a bill within those limits, and House Republicans now have cold feet having realized they’d have to cut a big chunk of domestic funding back to fiscal year 2002 levels. So neither the House nor Senate has voted to approve its own spending bill for the Departments of Labor, HHS, and Education. Assuming lawmakers don’t manage to find the cuts themselves, many federal programs, including most education ones, will be sequestered again. The continuing resolutions debated over the past week have appropriated well above the 2014 rate, at prior-year levels. That means lawmakers have likely set up federal programs for another round of blunt cuts down the line.

All in all, the shutdown leaves policymakers in D.C. and recipients of federal dollars around the country with a great deal of uncertainty. Congress could choose to end this shutdown quickly, before many serious side-effects occur. Or the shutdown could drag on, with neither side willing to cave. There could even be a short-term temporary funding bill—as short as one week, some lawmakers have argued—that would precipitate another round of the same debates almost immediately.

Finally, in just a few weeks, on October 17, the U.S. is projected to reach the nation’s debt ceiling. A bill to raise the debt ceiling could be seen as a prime legislative vehicle to pass a 2014 spending bill – but some members of Congress are considering yet another showdown when the debt ceiling debate rolls around.

Check back with Ed Money Watch over the coming weeks for more details, and for information on the 2013 and 2014 appropriations process, we’ve got the details in our April 2013 issue brief, Federal Education Budget Update: Fiscal Year 2013 Recap and Fiscal Year 2014 Early Analysis.

The Way We Talk: Choice

September 27, 2013
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This is the fourth in a series of posts reflecting on terminology pervading today’s polarizing debates about American education. In each post, we ask how various buzzwords—“professionalism,” “accountability,” “equity,” and the like—influence the conversations we have. What are the strengths, weaknesses, and blind spots that come with framing our arguments in each of these terms? The hope is that assessing the implications of the way we talk will prompt more productive discussions about improving PreK-12 education.

In the last “The Way We Talk” post, I argued that equity is the closest thing that American public education has to a sacred purpose. We expect our schools to be equal opportunity catalysts; once students complete their PreK–12 (or sometimes PreK–College) education, we generally act as though society has provided them an adequate platform for determining the course of their lives. Put another way, public schools are our community’s most tangible, most democratic commitment to sustaining the American Dream.

But democratic equity only covers part of the story. The United States is a liberaldemocracy. Its attitude towards education (and politics more generally) also stems from individualist liberals like Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, and John Locke. If we care about equity for all, we also care about choice. We care about freedom.

New Report Highlights Top Teachers’ Views on Education Policy

September 18, 2013

“Good teaching is hard to define, even for the profession’s most successful and reflective members.” So says a new report from The New Teacher Project (TNTP) that compiles highly effective teachers’ voices on issues ranging from their profession to hotbed education policy topics.

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