Family & Children

Tell Mama All About It

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
April 9, 2006 |

The timing was perfect. Just as a growing number of American women were entering the labor force, a massive wave of immigration -- much of it undocumented -- was headed north from Mexico and Central America.

Mexikota: The Plain States' Run for the Border

  • By
  • David Gray,
  • New America Foundation
April 1, 2006

In the wake of terrorist threats, gas price spikes, hurricanes, and a run-up in housing prices in certain markets, there has been broad discussion recently about the value to the U.S. of encouraging greater development in the nation’s interior. Population growth along America’s coasts is crowding more people into ever smaller areas, while the interior of the country remains relatively open. As the U.S population is projected to grow to 400 million in the next half century, America has an incentive to encourage people on the coasts to settle inland.

The Liberal Baby Bust

  • By
  • Phillip Longman,
  • New America Foundation
March 14, 2006 |

What's the difference between Seattle and Salt Lake City? There are many differences, of course, but here's one you might not know. In Seattle, there are nearly 45% more dogs than children. In Salt Lake City, there are nearly 19% more kids than dogs.

The Impact of Globalization on Children

Thursday, March 2, 2006 - 9:00am

Globalization is one of the most important, yet least understood, forces shaping our world. In a world of shifting work conditions and family living patterns, it impacts how Americans, and citizens of the world, raise their children. It touches on issues of child health and development, barriers to parents getting and keeping jobs, and problems families confront daily and in times of crisis. There is much that the world learns from America's economic and social strength, and there is much Americans can benefit from learning about how global forces impact families abroad. Dr.

Love in the Time of ... Technology

  • By
  • James Pinkerton,
  • New America Foundation
February 14, 2006 |

On Valentine's Day, thoughts turn to love. But the course of true love never did run smooth--even if it seems smoother now than ever.

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, at least three different St. Valentines are mentioned in the church's martyrologies for Feb. 14. One popular story about Valentine concerns the Third century Roman Emperor Claudius II, who decreed that young men had to stay single, to increase their suitability for military service. Valentine, a priest, continued to marry young people, until he was caught and executed.

Economic Growth Finally Having its Effect on Family Wages

  • By
  • David Gray,
  • New America Foundation
February 13, 2006

This week, the White House submitted its annual Economic Report of the President to Congress. It was a positive forecast driven by continuing strong consumer spending, business investment and export growth. Despite high energy prices and Hurricane Katrina, the White House had a lot of good news to trumpet on the economy from four years of largely uninterrupted economic growth.

For the complete document, please see the attached PDF version. 

Swamp Nurse

  • By
  • Katherine Boo,
  • New America Foundation
February 6, 2006 |

In the swamps of Louisiana, late autumn marks the end of the hurricane and the sugarcane seasons -- a time for removing plywood from windows and burning residues of harvest in the fields. Then begins the season of crayfish and, nine months having passed since the revelry of Mardi Gras, a season of newborn Cajuns. Among the yield of infants in the autumn of 2004 was a boy named Daigan James Plaisance Theriot, and, on the morning of Daigan's thirtieth day of life, he was seated next to a bag of raw chickens in the back of an Oldsmobile Cutlass.

A New Way to Help California's Poor

  • By
  • Anne Stuhldreher,
  • New America Foundation
February 3, 2006 |

California first lady Maria Shriver, John Edwards and other political luminaries have converged on Los Angeles for a summit on California poverty. The organizers asked speakers to present ways to help California's poor that are "innovative, practical and achievable."

A Homestead Act for the Twenty-First Century

  • By
  • Ted Halstead,
  • New America Foundation
February 3, 2006 |

The United States owes much of its status as the first mass middle-class society to enlightened social policy designed to broaden asset ownership. To this day, a quarter of all adult Americans enjoy a legacy of asset ownership traceable to the Homestead Act of 1862, which awarded 60 acres of land in the American West to families who lived on the land for five years. Likewise, the GI Bill, the Federal Housing Administration, and mortgage deduction policies paved the way for one of the highest home-ownership rates in the world.

Altered State; The Third California

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
  • and William Frey
January 29, 2006 |

The last great frontier for upward mobility in California extends from the far eastern suburbs of greater Los Angeles to the Sierra foothills in Northern California. It is there that the "California dream"--a place to create a new life and raise a family--is still possible. Call it the "Third California."

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