The New Yorker

How to Survive an Internet Apocalypse

April 12, 2014

The goal was to create a “wireless mesh network”—a collective of radio nodes, each one equally responsible for routing the communications of connected users. The Practocalypse version of the network would be mobile and ad hoc, relying entirely on peer-to-peer connections between devices, rather than on centralized servers. It would be a bit like a neighborhood ham-radio club, except using cell phones, laptops, and other Wi-Fi-enabled devices.

We Need Real Competition, Not a Cable-Internet Monopoly | The New Yorker

February 13, 2014

These figures are taken from an informative 2012 book, “The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use ‘Plain English’ to Rob You Blind,” by David Cay Johnston, a Pulitzer Prize-winning financial reporter. In response to Johnston and other critics, the cable and telecommunications industry commissioned its own research, which, predictably enough, made the U.S. performance look a bit better. But more recent independent reports, from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the New America Foundation, have confirmed what anybody who has spent some time abroad already knows.

Shopgirls

  • By
  • Katherine Zoepf,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2013 |

Shopgirls

  • By
  • Katherine Zoepf,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2013 |
Programs:

A Very Rare Book

  • By
  • Nicholas Schmidle,
  • New America Foundation
December 9, 2013 |

How Cold War Game Theory Can Resolve the Shutdown

  • By
  • Nicholas Thompson,
  • New America Foundation
October 7, 2013 |
Programs:

States of Health

  • By
  • Atul A. Gawande,
  • New America Foundation
September 7, 2013 |
Programs:

The Moral Dilemmas of Doctors During Disaster | The New Yorker

September 13, 2013

In the late summer of 2005, the waters loosed in the wake of Hurricane Katrina laid siege to New Orleans. At Memorial Medical Center, the power and then the backup generators failed, creating a silence one doctor described as the “sickest sound” of his life. Doctors and nurses, at times in darkness, struggled to take care of patients without life-saving machines, air conditioning, or functioning toilets. After several days of desperation, some allegedly euthanized critically ill patients, even as large-scale evacuations of the hospital began.

The President and the Press

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
June 10, 2013 |
Programs:
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