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The American Enterprise

Ideological Hurricane

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
January 31, 2006 |

Last September's tragedy in New Orleans revealed, in the starkest manner, the soft underbelly of America's cities. After all the 1990s rhetoric insisting that "Cities are back!" we got a glimpse behind the facades of a major urban center and tourist mecca which revealed many utterly dependent and disorganized residents, looking more like Third Worlders than denizens of a modern metropolis. In the process, the urban liberalism that has dominated city administration for the last generation was unmasked.

New Orleans as paragon of a hollowed-out city

America Still Beckons

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2005 |

The American dream may be a musty old relic in the minds of some American elites, but for Annique Lambe -- -who arrived in the U.S. 12 years ago from Ireland -- -it is alive and well. Now a schoolteacher in Manhattan, she marvels at the energy and opportunity that she and other friends who are also recent immigrants from Europe have found on these shores. "New York is a huge place where something is always happening," she says in a soft Irish lilt. "Now I am a part of it, living among the big towers and the skyline. It seems miraculous to me."

Europe's Latest Export; Antisemitism

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2005 |

For years, Americans have consumed fashions, expensive cars, and fancy foods from Europe. But the latest export from the old continent won't be nearly as tasty. It's left-wing anti-Semitism.

The U.S. Brain Belt

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
July 1, 2005 |

When A. T. Burgum came to the Dakota Territory in 1880, the way to riches lay in the deep, rich soil of the Red River Valley. A generation later, his son J. A. Burgum founded an elevator company in a small town called Arthur (current population 400). The company remained in family hands, and after A. T.'s great grandson Doug Burgum graduated from Arthur's high school, he left town to attend North Dakota State University and then Stanford. In 1983, after working in Chicago, he returned to North Dakota, lured back by another kind of natural resource: its people.

We're Already a Homeownership Society

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
March 1, 2005 |

Fresno, California -- In the late 1980s, Rich Mostert had the usual dream -- a house, a flourishing business, a family -- but in the wrong place. He was living in San Francisco, one of the nation's most expensive places, and he didn't have sufficient cash to turn any of his dreams into reality.

Get Used To It

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
January 1, 2005 |

For the better part of the last half century, urbanists, planners, and environmentalists have railed against suburbia, and the dreaded trend of cities to "sprawl" outward from the old city core. Yet despite many attempts to discourage such growth, the pattern continues -- not only in America but in nearly all modern countries. The battle against sprawl is over. Sprawl won.

The Moldy Massachusetts Miracle

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2004 |

A midst the coverage of John Kerry's nomination in Boston last summer, the region that produced him -- New England -- received remarkably little intelligent scrutiny. For the most part, the area was portrayed as quaint, idiosyncratic, and brainy, a kind of screwball seafood stew of Harvard, the Red Sox, and ethnic diversity spanning Yankees, Italians, Irish, and a host of more colorful recent newcomers.

Rediscovering Lewis and Clark Territory

  • By
  • Joel Kotkin,
  • New America Foundation
July 1, 2004 |

When President Thomas Jefferson acquired the vast new territory of the Louisiana Purchase, St. Louis, founded in the late 1760s near the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, was the natural launching point for an exploratory expedition. So in May 1804, Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery set out from this city to map the sprawling new American wilderness.

Great Expectations

  • By
  • James Forman Jr.,
  • New America Foundation
September 1, 2002 |

The importance of a university education is not seriously disputed in the United States. Most Americans agree that, whether one is seeking what former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli called "a place of light, of liberty, and of learning," or simply the opportunity to earn 75 percent more than the average high school graduate, a college campus is the place to look. Even as our primary schools are routinely attacked for under-performance, our higher education system continues to draw students from around the world.

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